2010-01-27 / Front Page

SCV holds Lee-Jackson banquet

By Deborah Bennett Millen News Editor

Mark A Simpson, adjutant in chief, National Sons of Confederate Veterans, was the guest speaker for a Lee-Jackson banquet hosted by the local SCV #2102 camp. From left, are Camp Commander Darryl Drake, Simpson and SCV member Neil Dickey. (Staff photo by Deborah Bennett) Mark A Simpson, adjutant in chief, National Sons of Confederate Veterans, was the guest speaker for a Lee-Jackson banquet hosted by the local SCV #2102 camp. From left, are Camp Commander Darryl Drake, Simpson and SCV member Neil Dickey. (Staff photo by Deborah Bennett) Celebrating and preserving a true history of the 1861-1865 periods is the mission of not only the national Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV) organization but also that of the local Buckhead-Fort Lawton #2102 SCV. Promotion of that goal was highlighted Friday, Jan. 15, when the local SCV held its first-ever Lee-Jackson banquet at Magnolia Springs State Park.

Mark A Simpson, adjutant in chief, National SCV, was the guest speaker for the occasion that celebrated the birthdays of Robert E. Lee and Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson. Mr. Simpson remarked that the event was held in honor of a “fine military duo” and “two great men.”

A top graduate of West Point, Lee distinguished himself as an exceptional soldier in the U.S. Army for 32 years. He is best known for commanding the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia in the War Between the States. Lee’s eventual role in the newly established Confederacy was to serve as a senior military adviser to President Jefferson Davis.

Jackson was a Confederate general and is considered by many military historians to be one of the most gifted tactical commanders in United States history. On April 27, 1861, Virginia Governor John Letcher ordered Colonel Jackson to take command at Harpers Ferry, where he would assemble and command the famous “Stonewall Brigade”, consisting of the 2nd, 4th, 5th, 27th, and 33rd Virginia Infantry regiments. He got his nickname “Stonewall” from the fact that he and his brigade never retreated but always stood as a stone wall.

With approximately 900 camps nationally, the SCV is the direct heir of the United Confederate Veterans and the oldest hereditary organization for male descendants of Confederate soldiers. Local SCV Commander Darryl Drake emphasized that membership was based upon “kinship to a Confederate veteran, noting that the 1910 Census of Jenkins County listed nine black Confederate soldiers.

“Organized at Richmond, Virginia in 1896, the SCV is a historical, patriotic and non-political organization,” said Mr. Simpson. He called attention to the ongoing SCV programs at the local, state and national levels which offer members a wide range of activities that include preservation work, marking of Confederate soldiers’ graves, re-enactments and regular meetings to discuss the history of the War Between the States.

Membership in the SCV is open to all male descendants of any veteran who served honorably in the Confederate armed forces. Membership can be obtained through direct or collateral family lines. Kinship to a veteran must be documented genealogically. The minimum age for full membership is 12, but there is no minimum for a Cadet membership.

The local SCV #2102 was chartered Feb. 28, 2006. Camp 2102 meets every third Friday of the month at Magnolia Springs State Park at 7:30 p.m. The public is invited to attend any of the meetings.

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