2018-10-10 / Front Page

Gail Chance returns to work in Probate Office


Gail Chance returned to work in the Jenkins County Probate Office Oct. 1st following treatments for breast cancer. She was honored by co-workers upon her return to work. From left, are Ashley Lyons, Patricia Rich, Pam Foreman and Bernice Riles; second row: Earline Thompson, Gail Chance, Wanda Burke, Shannon Turner and Elizabeth Landing; and third row: Jeanette Miller, Chief Rudine Becton, Diane Arnold, Connie Rider and Linda Pittman. 
(Staff photo by Deborah Bennett) Gail Chance returned to work in the Jenkins County Probate Office Oct. 1st following treatments for breast cancer. She was honored by co-workers upon her return to work. From left, are Ashley Lyons, Patricia Rich, Pam Foreman and Bernice Riles; second row: Earline Thompson, Gail Chance, Wanda Burke, Shannon Turner and Elizabeth Landing; and third row: Jeanette Miller, Chief Rudine Becton, Diane Arnold, Connie Rider and Linda Pittman. (Staff photo by Deborah Bennett) October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, a worldwide annual campaign involving thousands of organizations, to highlight the importance of breast awareness, education and research. For Gail Chance, it is also a time for thankfulness. Gail returned to work in the Jenkins County Probate Office on October 1st following months of treatment for breast cancer.

With no history of the disease in her family, Gail said she did not have regular mammograms, something she regrets now, and was stunned when in January of this year she developed symptoms that led her to finally have a mammogram. A biopsy confirmed breast cancer and she embarked on a long journey that included four chemo treatments spaced out every three weeks and four weeks of radiation.

“The hardest part of the treatments was by far the chemo,” Gail said. “I had a reaction with the first treatment and was hospitalized twice due to other conditions brought on by the treatments.”

There were also emotional challenges for Gail to overcome, the greatest of which, she said, was losing her hair.

“I just left it in the hands of the Lord and tried to keep a positive attitude that I was going to beat it,” she said.

With the founding of The Breast Cancer Research Foundation in 1993, the pink ribbon which had previously been used to symbolize breast cancer, was chosen as the symbol for breast cancer awareness. And Gail was honored by her co-workers, all wearing pink, with a luncheon upon her return to work.

“I am so thankful for all of the support I have received during my treatments and encourage every woman to have a yearly mammogram, It can save your life,” said Gail.

The probability of a woman developing breast cancer is frightening: at age 50 it is 1 in 49; at age 60 it is 1 in 29 and at age 70 increases to 1 in 25.

Breast cancer typically produces no symptoms when the tumor is small and most easily treated, which is why screening is important for early detection. The most common physical sign is a painless lump. Sometimes breast cancer spreads to underarm lymph nodes and causes a lump or swelling, even before the original breast tumor is large enough to be felt. Less common signs and symptoms includes breast pain or heaviness; persistent changes, such as swelling, thickening, or redness of the skin; and nipple abnormalities such as spontaneous discharge (especially if bloody), erosion, or retraction. Any persistent change in the breast should be evaluated by a physician as soon as possible.

Return to top